Research Papers

Likes and impulsivity: Investigating the relationship between actual smartphone use and delay discounting

Researchers with the EU-funded DIGYMATEX project at the Freie Universität Berlin, Tim Schulz van Endert and Peter N. C. Mohr, found a positive relationship between hours of smartphone use and impulsive decision making, through an experiment focusing on delayed gratification. The study was published in PLOS ONE on 18 November 2020, in an article entitled “Likes and impulsivity: Investigating the relationship between actual smartphone use and delay discounting”.

The study indicates that use of digital devices can have moderately negative effects on children’s mental health and socio-emotional development, with the extent of the damage varying widely, depending on the quantity and quality of the child’s specific screen-time activities.

Emerging Digital Generations? Impacts of Child Digital Use on Mental and Socioemotional Well-Being across Two Cohorts in Ireland, 2007–2018

A new academic study by DIGYMATEX researchers Melissa Bohnert and Dr. Pablo Gracia, of Trinity College Dublin’s Department of Sociology, published in the 31 August 2020 issue of Child Indicators Research, the official Journal of the International Society for Child Indicators.

The study indicates that use of digital devices can have moderately negative effects on children’s mental health and socio-emotional development, with the extent of the damage varying widely, depending on the quantity and quality of the child’s specific screen-time activities.

When Social Interaction Backfires: Frequent Social Interaction During the COVID-19 Pandemic Is Associated With Decreased Well-Being and Higher Panic Buying

A new academic study by DIGYMATEX researcher Prof. Arnd Florack and Dr. Hyunji Kim of the University of Vienna, published in the July 2021 issue of Frontiers in Psychology Journal.

The paper suggests that conversions on social network sites were related to reduced well-being and increased panic buying in the first days of the pandemic and it shows a backfiring effect of these communications which are usually thought to reduce the stress level.